Seitan - Minced Meat (Asian & Western Style)

 
Seitan is made from vital wheat gluten, and is a protein with a terrific texture. Although this is well-stocked in vegetarian grocery stores, I would like to give it a shot because homemade seitan is preservative-free and definitely more budget friendly.

It is surprisingly quite simple! The long simmering of the broth imparts a wonderful depth of flavour to seitan. Store these in you fridge for quick meals with your porridge and soup noodles any time! Well, though this is good whole wheat gluten, it is recommended to eat in moderation since it is still gluten. It applies for all food. Use all-spice powder if you are making the western minced meat, and Chinese 5 spice powder for the Chinese style.
 
Ingredients
Broth
 2 tsp canola oil
 4 spring onions, roughly chopped
 2 dried chilli, chopped
 2 garlic cloves, crushed
 1500ml water
 1 Tbsp soy sauce or Braggs Liquid Aminos

Seitan
 115g vital wheat gluten  
 1 tsp all-spice powder or Chinese 5 spice powder 
 1/2 tsp cayenne or chilli powder 
 250ml water
 2 Tbsp soy sauce or Braggs Liquid Aminos
 1 tsp sesame oil
 
Method
For the Broth:
1. Heat oil in a medium pot and sauté spring onions, dried chilli and garlic until aromatic.

2. Add 1500ml water, soy sauce and bring to boil, and reduce to simmer. Partially cover and simmer while you prepare the seitan.


For Seitan:
1. In a huge and wide mixing bow, whisk together vital wheat gluten, all-spices and cayenne powder.
 
2. In a separate bowl, combine 250ml water, soy sauce and sesame oil.
 
3. Add wet ingredients to the dry, mixing with a spatula until combined. The mixture will be stiff and rubbery. Do not worry about the excess liquid in the mixing bowl.
 
4. In the mixing bowl, knead for 2 minutes. Set aside for 10 minutes and knead for another 1 minute.
 
5. Divide the dough into 4 equal sections. Gently stretch each piece with your hands.
 
6. Add the seitan pieces to the broth, partially cover the pot and simmer for 45 to 60 minutes, turning occasionally until it is firm and has fully expanded. The seitan will expand a lot, so add more water if necessary .
 
7. Turn the heat off, take the lid off and let sit for 15 minutes or until ready to use. Remove from broth and use as desired.
 
The dough after kneading.
Ok.. I know this does not look appealing, but I upload this
so that you know you are on the right track!

After simmering for about 20 minutes.
Notes
☼ Seitan can be made in advance and kept in water or cooking liquid for 1 week in fridge, or up to 3 months in freezer. If refrigerating, change the water every 2 days.
   
Hearty Brown Rice Porridge with Minced 'Pork'
Click for recipe


8 comments:

  1. Anonymous18 June, 2014

    Hi, may I check with you, to freeze seitan do you soak in water and freeze or just the seitan itself?

    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi thanks for dropping by. For freezing, you do not need to soak in water. In fact, I have tried putting it in fridge for a 3-4 days without soaking in water too, it is still perfectly fine! Try it out and update me ;)

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  3. Hi. I have been following your blog and have bookmarked it. On weekends i get to try your recipes.

    Meanwhile I wanted to try seitan this week. but unfortunately I couldn't find "Bob's Red Mill Vital Wheat Gluten flour". Which section of Mustafa Center has this? I live in Clementi, so do you happen to know any shops near that locality that sell this?

    Thanks a lot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Pavan, glad to hear that you tried out some of my recipes, how did it go? Do comment on the page of the recipe after trying or if you have any questions ;)

      It is actually near to the section where they placed the peas, beans, and whole wheat flour. I will take note of row number the next round I go and update in my blog. Thanks for asking.

      You can get at some Cold Storage or Giant Hyper but it costs SGD12.50 instead of SGD8.50 at Mustafa for the same product, the difference is so huge!

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  4. I love your blog so much, it is very informative especially the 'where to buy' stuff! I plan to make this seitan this weekend, it is very unique to we Asians.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jenny, thanks for the message. I can totally understand how difficult it is to find uncommon ingredients in various local contexts. I'm glad my sharing is of help to you. Let me know how it goes when you tried! ;)

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  5. Wow, this looks really good, I am going to try it! No need to buy those store-bought mocked meat anymore, so much additives and sodium, nah.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Laureen, I totally agreed! ;)

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